How to Use GROWTH Function in Google Sheets 

Growth Function in Google Sheets

The GROWTH function in Excel is useful in predicting future values for your business.

This function helps predict growth and provides an ideal exponential growth trend in the future by analyzing historical data. 

The rules for using the GROWTH function in Google Sheets are as follows:

  • The function also requires values and the number of periods you want to calculate the growth.
  • The function then outputs future values based on the given parameters.

 

Suppose you also have a business with revenue over the past five years, and you would like to know the potential income in the upcoming year. With the GROWTH function, this task will also become much more manageable. Furthermore, it could help in your business strategy and decision-making.

 

Another example is when doing research in a lab. Let’s say a researcher has an organic solution containing bacteria that also grows exponentially by a given period. Furthermore, using the GROWTH function in Google Sheets, a sample data for a number of bacteria with given time periods is all we need to accomplish this task.

 

Now that we know when to use the GROWTH function in Google Sheets, let’s dive into how to use it and work on an actual sample spreadsheet.

 

 

The Anatomy of the GROWTH Function

So the syntax (the way we write) the GROWTH function is as follows:

=GROWTH(known_data_y, [known_data_x], [new_data_x], [b])

 

Let’s dissect this thing and understand what each of these terms means:

  • = the equal sign is just how we start any function in Google Sheets.
  • GROWTH() – this is our GROWTH function. GROWTH will take the value and the optional arguments (additional data) to predict future values. 
  • known_data_y Required data. This contains a set of y-values you already know in the relationship y = b*m^x.
    • If the array known_data_y is in a single column, then each column of known_data_x is interpreted as a separate variable.
    • If the array known_data_y is in a single row, then each row of known_data_x is interpreted as a separate variable.
    • Any of the numbers in known_data_y is 0 or negative, GROWTH returns the #NUM! error value.
  • known_data_xOptional data. This contains a set of x-values that you may already know in the relationship y = b*m^x.
    • The array known_data_x can include one or more sets of variables. If only one variable is used, known_data_y and known_data_x can be ranges of any shape with equal dimensions. Take note that if more than one variable is used, known_data_y must be a vector (a range with a height of one row or width of one column).
    • If known_data_x is omitted, it is assumed to be the array {1,2,3,…} that is the same size as known_data_y.
  • new_data_xOptional data. These are new x-values for which you want GROWTH to return corresponding y-values.
    • new_data_x values must include a column (or row) for each independent variable, just as known_data_x does. So, if known_data_y is in a single column, known_data_x and new_data_x must have the same number of columns. If known_data_y is in a single row, known_data_x and new_data_x values must have the same number of rows.
    • Note if the new_data_x is omitted, it is assumed to be the same as known_data_x.
    • If both known_data_x and new_data_x are omitted, they are assumed to be the array {1,2,3,…} that is the same size as known_data_y.
  • bOptional Data. A logical value specifying whether to force the constant b to equal 1.
    • If const is TRUE or omitted, b is calculated normally.
    • If const is FALSE, b is set equal to 1, and the m-values are adjusted so that y = m^x.

 

 

A Real Example of Using GROWTH Function

Take a look at the example below to see how GROWTH functions are used in Google Sheets.

GROWTH Function in Google Sheets

In the example above, ABC Farms has provided its revenue over the past five years. Based on the previously given data, we want to calculate the estimated revenue for the year 2022. 

To predict the revenue for 2022, we will be using the GROWTH formula in Google Sheets. 

GROWTH Function in Google Sheets
In this scenario, the revenue and year columns are the values and number of periods we needed to calculate our growth, respectively. The new data x is the upcoming year which is 2022. 

GROWTH Function in Google Sheets

As a result, ABC Farms will probably generate a revenue of around $48,815.79.

You may make a copy of the spreadsheet using the link I have attached below. 

If you’re ready to try out the GROWTH function in Google Sheets, let’s begin writing it ourselves!

 

 

How to Use GROWTH Function in Google Sheets

  1. In the first column, input the period or time of the known data. For this guide, I added Years 1-10. In the second column, input the values related to data specified in the first column (i.e., No. of Sales for each year).
    GROWTH Function in Google Sheets
  2. Click on any cell to make it the active cell. As I wanted to calculate the no. of sales for years 8-10, I will also be selecting B9, B10, and B11.
  3. Next, simply type the equal sign ‘=‘ and the word ‘GROWTH‘. An auto-suggest box appears, displaying a short definition of the GROWTH function.
    growth
  4. On your keyboard, press the Tab key to continue with the formula. You will then notice the box displaying the correct syntax for the GROWTH function.
    year data
  5. Select cells B2B8 as the known_data_y, then press comma ,‘. Next, select A2A8 as the known_data_x and press comma,‘ again. And then, choose A9A11 as the new_data_x and press the right parentheses ‘)’.
    GROWTH Function in Google Sheets

 Now on your keyboard, hit the Enter key. Notice that all three rows will be updated with the predicted number of sales.
no of sales

That’s pretty much everything you need to know when working with the GROWTH function in Google Sheets. Furthermore, This guide shows how simple it is to provide data and predict future values, which can be essential to your business, research, or any other field where an exponential trend is being used.

The GROWTH function is just one example of a convenient and useful function in Google Sheets. You can also check out other Google Sheets formulas to create more powerful worksheets.

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