How to Use the IFS Function in Excel

This guide will discuss how to use the IFS function in Excel.

The rules for using the IFS function in Excel are the following:

  • When no true conditions are found, the IFS function returns a #N/A error. 
  • When the logical_test argument results in a value that is not true or false, the IFS function returns a #VALUE! Error.
  • When we do not provide a corresponding value to the logical_test argument, we will get an error message saying “You’ve entered too few arguments for this function”.
  • If we want to specify a default result, we need to enter true as our final logical_test argument. If none of the other conditions are met, the function will return the corresponding value. 

We all know that Excel is a popular tool for calculations and functions. And one of its popular functions is the IFS function. So the IFS function is often used for analyzing logical statements. And the IFS function is more practical to use than the IF function.

Furthermore, the IFS function will evaluate multiple conditions. Then, it will return a specified value when it identifies or determines it to be a true condition. And we can specify or customize the conditions of the function to return a value that matches the conditions. 

Let’s take a sample scenario wherein we need to use the IFS function. 

Suppose you are a teacher encoding the grades of your students after a test. And you want to display the corresponding letter grade when you input the numerical scores. But, manually inputting the corresponding letter grades would take too much time. So, this is where you can utilize the IFS function.

Great! Before we move on to a real example of how to use the IFS function, let’s first understand the syntax of the IFS function.

The Anatomy of the IFS Function

The syntax or the way we write the IFS function is as follows:

=IFS(logical_test1,value_if_true1,...)

Let’s take apart this formula and understand what each term means:

  • = the equal sign is how we activate any function in Excel.
  • IFS() is our IFS function. And this function checks whether the one or more conditions we input are met. Then, it will return the corresponding value to the first true condition. 
  • logical_test1 is a required argument. And this refers to any value or expression which will be evaluated to be true or false. Furthermore, we can input more than one logical_test or condition. 
  • value_if_true1 is also a required argument. And this is the corresponding value that will be returned if logical_test1 is true. So each logical argument in the function has a corresponding value. 

Awesome! Let’s move on and discuss a real example of how to use the IFS function in Excel.

A Real Example of Using the IFS Function in Excel

Let’s say we are a teacher currently inputting the students’ grades after an exam. And we need to display the appropriate letter grade according to their scores in the exam. So our initial data containing the student’s name and numerical grades would look something like this:

Initial data set

 

Then, we need to return the corresponding letter grade value depending on their numerical grade. Firstly, we need to lay out our grading system. So, the ranges of numerical grades have corresponding letter grades. In this case, our grading system would be like this:

Equal or greater than 90 A
Equal or greater than 80 B
Equal or greater than 70 C
Equal or greater than 60 D
Equal or less than 59 F

 

Afterward, we will use the IFS function based on the grading system above. Essentially, the IFS function will evaluate each condition to determine if it is true. 

If it is false, it will move on to the next conditions until it finds a true condition. Then, it will return the corresponding value of the first true condition found. 

Furthermore, we need to learn the acceptable logical operators for the logical test of the IFS function. So, we can refer to the table below to create our logical tests. 

Less than <
Greater than >
Equal to =
Not equal to  <>
Less than or equal to <=
Greater than or equal to >=

Next, we can simply use the grading system and logical operators to create our logical arguments for our IFS function. For instance, our first logical argument would be =A1>=90, ”A”. 

So, this logical argument will check whether the numerical grade inputted in the cell reference is greater than or equal to 90. If the condition is met and the numerical grade is greater than or equal to 90, the function will return the corresponding letter grade, which is A. 

And our final output would look like this:Final output

 

You can make your own copy of the spreadsheet above using the link attached below. 

Great! Now let’s move on and learn the step-by-step process of how to use the IFS function in Excel.

How to Use the IFS Function in Excel

In this section, we will explain the steps of how to use the IFS function in Excel. Furthermore, each step will contain a detailed explanation and pictures to guide you along the process.

1. Firstly, we need to select the cell where we want the IFS function to return the value. In this case, we will select cell C2. Then, we need to start the function by typing an “=” equal sign and the IFS function. 

Next, we need to input our first logical test. In this case, we will check or determine whether the numerical grade is greater than or equal to 90 which will return a letter grade of A. So type in the formula “=IFS(B2>=90, “A”)”.

Afterward, we can start inputting more logical tests. In this case, we will follow our grading system. So our entire formula would be “=IFS(B2>=90,”A”,B2>=80,”B”,B2>=70,”C”,B2>=60,”D”,B2<=59,”F”)”. Then, press the Enter key to return the results.

Use the IFS Function in Excel

 

2. Secondly, we must copy the formula to the rest of the rows by dragging it down.

Use the IFS Function in Excel

 

3. And tada! We have successfully used the IFS function in Excel.

Use the IFS Function in Excel

 

And that’s pretty much it! Wasn’t it quite easy? We have discussed how to use the IFS function in Excel. Now you can apply this whenever you need to determine multiple conditions if they are true or false. 

Are you interested in learning more about what Excel can do? You can now use the IFS function and the various other Microsoft Excel formulas available to create great worksheets that work for you. Make sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be the first to know about the latest guides and tutorials from us.

Get emails from us about Google Sheets.

Our goal this year is to create lots of rich, bite-sized tutorials for Google Sheets users like you. If you liked this one, you'll love what we are working on! Readers receive ✨ early access ✨ to new content.

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like